July 16, 2014
newyorker:

Sarah Larson on discovering the music of Devon Sproule: http://nyr.kr/1tRGo2y

“Who was this? It wasn’t a revolutionary sound—it amazed me because it was great. An acoustic guitar, and then a young woman’s voice, warm, confident, gentle, singing, ‘It’s good to get out of the house.’ There was no barrier between it and me—I loved it immediately.”

Photograph by Philip Ryalls/Redferns via Getty.

newyorker:

Sarah Larson on discovering the music of Devon Sproule: http://nyr.kr/1tRGo2y

“Who was this? It wasn’t a revolutionary sound—it amazed me because it was great. An acoustic guitar, and then a young woman’s voice, warm, confident, gentle, singing, ‘It’s good to get out of the house.’ There was no barrier between it and me—I loved it immediately.”

Photograph by Philip Ryalls/Redferns via Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com)

July 9, 2014
The Year of the Snake, by Shafiqah Hudson

Shafiqah Hudson’s “The Year Of The Snake.” From The Toast yesterday.  I’d never read anything she’d written before, and it is a gorgeous piece.  

July 8, 2014
(via thehollowsquare, meganmcisaac)

(via thehollowsquare, meganmcisaac)

June 24, 2014
natgeofound:

Children play in pool they have dug out of the sand on the beach in Le Havre, France, 1936.Photograph by W. Robert Moore, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

Children play in pool they have dug out of the sand on the beach in Le Havre, France, 1936.Photograph by W. Robert Moore, National Geographic Creative

June 20, 2014
fsgbooks:

"Marilynne Robinson, one of the greatest novelists of our time, returns to the town of Gilead in an unforgettable story of a girlhood lived on the fringes of society in fear, awe, and wonder."
Sneak peek of Lila…

This is a lovely cover. I have the house to myself this weekend and I’ve got the Cazalets, the Silkworm and a proof of the new S—— W——- and I’m going to BINGE READ them all. This is partly because I have a question I’m too ashamed to ask an individual person:  I mean, how long after you have a baby are you able to truly lose yourself in a book again? Is it like, a day? Or 7 years? Will it be ages before I can tear through the new Marilyn Robinson all at once? Asking for myself.

fsgbooks:

"Marilynne Robinson, one of the greatest novelists of our time, returns to the town of Gilead in an unforgettable story of a girlhood lived on the fringes of society in fear, awe, and wonder."

Sneak peek of Lila

This is a lovely cover. I have the house to myself this weekend and I’ve got the Cazalets, the Silkworm and a proof of the new S—— W——- and I’m going to BINGE READ them all. This is partly because I have a question I’m too ashamed to ask an individual person: I mean, how long after you have a baby are you able to truly lose yourself in a book again? Is it like, a day? Or 7 years? Will it be ages before I can tear through the new Marilyn Robinson all at once? Asking for myself.

April 27, 2014

Illustrated manuscript of The Witchcraft of Dame Darrel of York by Charles Godfrey Leland, humorist, folklorist, poet, and artist. Leland presents the book as an account of witchcraft practiced by Dame Darrel, “the Wise Woman of York,” in medieval England, though the work is primarily based on Leland’s own research and imagination. The majority of the manuscript catalogs various types of fairies, elves, goblins, and other spirits in alphabetical order, but there are also stories and descriptions of spells, all of which are paired with fantastical drawings. If you’re inspired to page through the full volume, the Digital Library record is here. I recommend page 137 for an entry on phasmation or a “fantome.” This manuscript is found in HSP’s Charles Godfrey Leland papers [0363] collection.

(Source: hspdigitallibrary, via theenglishladye)

April 24, 2014
Tonight: Alice Greenway & Rebecca Hunt

Hello!  Tonight I will be talking to not one, but TWO writers: Alice Greenway, author of White Ghost Girls and a new novel The Bird Skinner, and Rebecca Hunt, author of Mr. Chartwell and her new book Everland

Things I hope to discuss are Islands, Victorian children’s adventure novels and Rebecca’s pet pug Nancy who recently stole the show when Rebecca was interviewed for the Telegraph.  Their two books are brilliant on their own and work very well together, and if you’re into Arctic expeditions gone wrong, ornithology, gruff seafaring men and/or women you should come and see it: All the info is here: http://www.lutyensrubinstein.co.uk/bookshop-news-events/

March 29, 2014
"Now I had a voracious appetite to consume certain books I’d read long ago, revisiting passages that had always been especially moving. Or — and this was fun and also eerie in its accuracy — I found myself submitting to cravings for books I had never before read but the combined language, plot, and characters of which turned out to produce the perfect meal of prose for this pregnant bibliophile."

Allison K. Gibson, On Literary Cravings and Aftertastes” (via millionsmillions)

Such a great read.

(via italicsmine)

(via italicsmine)

March 24, 2014
Book Recommendations From Men: Robin Hobb

"I’m looking for a fat fantasy epic in which a female protagonist has powers that mean she succeeds where others would fail." I said to T the other day. My reading habits, like my eating and music listening habits, have become compulsive and specific.  I have been listening to nothing but the Beach Boys singing Kokomo for about a month now, and eating cereal, bowls of it.  Maybe cravings are more holistic than I thought.

"I’ll ask [my partner]" said T, "He’ll know."  And lo, not half an hour later, she returned with a name: Robin Hobb’s SHIP OF MAGIC.  It was exactly what I was looking for.  You know, when you just want your heroines to have a destiny and a skill set to match it?  Althea, in this book, is psychically connected to her ship.  She also disguises herself as a boy to learn her trade, which she turns out to be good at. I mean, what more could you want?  Sex?  Lots of that.  Fighting?  SURE.  Revolution?  Absolutely.  Monsters?  Some, but not too many.  It’s a genuine pleasure, this, like Game of Thrones if Game of Thrones was written by a woman.  And by that I mean, if Game of Thrones was even better.  ROBIN HOBB.  She’s written a lot more than SHIP OF MAGIC, but do start there.  

March 10, 2014
newyorker:

Ben Yagoda on a short history of “hack” and why it has become the word of the moment: http://nyr.kr/1gfsXNl

“Although Lifehacker and other neutral or positive applications of the word are increasingly prominent, the black-hat meaning still prevails among the general public. Indeed, it has probably influenced the interpretation and enforcement of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. It’s as if the mere existence of the term ‘hacker’ has added ammunition to the prosecution of such figures as Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, Chelsea Manning, and Aaron Swartz, the Internet activist who was indicted and charged with eleven violations of the act in 2011.”

Illustration by Jordan Awan.

newyorker:

Ben Yagoda on a short history of “hack” and why it has become the word of the moment: http://nyr.kr/1gfsXNl

“Although Lifehacker and other neutral or positive applications of the word are increasingly prominent, the black-hat meaning still prevails among the general public. Indeed, it has probably influenced the interpretation and enforcement of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. It’s as if the mere existence of the term ‘hacker’ has added ammunition to the prosecution of such figures as Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, Chelsea Manning, and Aaron Swartz, the Internet activist who was indicted and charged with eleven violations of the act in 2011.”

Illustration by Jordan Awan.

(Source: newyorker.com)