August 12, 2014
Marc Maron Interviews Robin Williams

Have you started listening to the WTF podcast yet?  You might not like podcasts, I suppose.  But if you DO, WTF is great.  No wait, you might not like comedy or music either.  But if you like both of those things, WTF is perfect for you.  The first one I heard was Maron’s interview with RuPaul.  Oh my.  When they’re good, they’re so very very good.  But here I am anyway suggesting you start today with the Robin Williams WTF.  I think it was done in 2010 just after Williams finished a stint in rehab, and it’s just a great hour of two sweary ex-addict comedians going deep about what’s beautiful in life and in comedy.  It was very moving.  It’s at the link for free for a bit, and it’s really worth it. 

August 5, 2014
We're hiring! (again)

emilybooks:

We’re looking for an intern to start Sept 1 and continue through Jan 1. We’d like you to be currently enrolled in college, ideally in the NY metro area. The position entails a maximum of 5 hours of work per week that you do at home, or wherever you like to work, and pays $10/hour. You’ll also…

August 3, 2014
Welcome to the C.S.A.!

newyorker:

A humorous list of produce from your local community-supported agriculture association: http://nyr.kr/1uPWF8I

MOUNTAIN HOLLYCRESS: 
Refreshing and nutritious, mountain hollycress is the perfect addition to an early-summer salad.

DECORATIVE MOUNTAIN HOLLYCRESS
: Identical in appearance…

(Source: newyorker.com)

July 31, 2014
Amazon’s Failed Pitch to Authors

newyorker:

Vauhini Vara explains why Amazon’s proposed e-book deal with Hachette is not necessarily good for authors: http://nyr.kr/1n78f5s

“Amazon has a huge share of the e-book business, through its Kindle e-reader—even more than it does with physical books. If lower e-book prices were to…

(Source: newyorker.com)

July 16, 2014
newyorker:

Sarah Larson on discovering the music of Devon Sproule: http://nyr.kr/1tRGo2y

“Who was this? It wasn’t a revolutionary sound—it amazed me because it was great. An acoustic guitar, and then a young woman’s voice, warm, confident, gentle, singing, ‘It’s good to get out of the house.’ There was no barrier between it and me—I loved it immediately.”

Photograph by Philip Ryalls/Redferns via Getty.

newyorker:

Sarah Larson on discovering the music of Devon Sproule: http://nyr.kr/1tRGo2y

“Who was this? It wasn’t a revolutionary sound—it amazed me because it was great. An acoustic guitar, and then a young woman’s voice, warm, confident, gentle, singing, ‘It’s good to get out of the house.’ There was no barrier between it and me—I loved it immediately.”

Photograph by Philip Ryalls/Redferns via Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com)

July 9, 2014
The Year of the Snake, by Shafiqah Hudson

Shafiqah Hudson’s “The Year Of The Snake.” From The Toast yesterday.  I’d never read anything she’d written before, and it is a gorgeous piece.  

July 8, 2014
(via thehollowsquare, meganmcisaac)

(via thehollowsquare, meganmcisaac)

June 24, 2014
natgeofound:

Children play in pool they have dug out of the sand on the beach in Le Havre, France, 1936.Photograph by W. Robert Moore, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

Children play in pool they have dug out of the sand on the beach in Le Havre, France, 1936.Photograph by W. Robert Moore, National Geographic Creative

June 20, 2014
fsgbooks:

"Marilynne Robinson, one of the greatest novelists of our time, returns to the town of Gilead in an unforgettable story of a girlhood lived on the fringes of society in fear, awe, and wonder."
Sneak peek of Lila…

This is a lovely cover. I have the house to myself this weekend and I’ve got the Cazalets, the Silkworm and a proof of the new S—— W——- and I’m going to BINGE READ them all. This is partly because I have a question I’m too ashamed to ask an individual person:  I mean, how long after you have a baby are you able to truly lose yourself in a book again? Is it like, a day? Or 7 years? Will it be ages before I can tear through the new Marilyn Robinson all at once? Asking for myself.

fsgbooks:

"Marilynne Robinson, one of the greatest novelists of our time, returns to the town of Gilead in an unforgettable story of a girlhood lived on the fringes of society in fear, awe, and wonder."

Sneak peek of Lila

This is a lovely cover. I have the house to myself this weekend and I’ve got the Cazalets, the Silkworm and a proof of the new S—— W——- and I’m going to BINGE READ them all. This is partly because I have a question I’m too ashamed to ask an individual person: I mean, how long after you have a baby are you able to truly lose yourself in a book again? Is it like, a day? Or 7 years? Will it be ages before I can tear through the new Marilyn Robinson all at once? Asking for myself.

April 27, 2014

Illustrated manuscript of The Witchcraft of Dame Darrel of York by Charles Godfrey Leland, humorist, folklorist, poet, and artist. Leland presents the book as an account of witchcraft practiced by Dame Darrel, “the Wise Woman of York,” in medieval England, though the work is primarily based on Leland’s own research and imagination. The majority of the manuscript catalogs various types of fairies, elves, goblins, and other spirits in alphabetical order, but there are also stories and descriptions of spells, all of which are paired with fantastical drawings. If you’re inspired to page through the full volume, the Digital Library record is here. I recommend page 137 for an entry on phasmation or a “fantome.” This manuscript is found in HSP’s Charles Godfrey Leland papers [0363] collection.

(Source: hspdigitallibrary, via theenglishladye)